Grouply Talk 1

February 18, 2008
[Posted here by permission of the author, part of a conversation between two moderators]Before I say anything else, you can probably guess that if you open this topic on-list, it may become very hot and flood the board with OT traffic for a long time.  However, if you feel, as I do, that members should be aware of what’s going on, maybe you could post an announcement but restrict dialog on it, referring people instead to the group links below.  Then again, maybe you’ll like Grouply, too, and welcome their hosting a duplicate of your group’s restricted message archive (which they may already have)!

The message I sent you is a copy of the special notice that I sent the members of my groups.  Actually I first sent a notice just saying we will not permit Grouply users, no explanation.  One person asked why.  So I followed up with what I sent you, just for the record, knowing most of my members are not especially tech savvy and don’t care.  None of my co-mods had heard of Grouply until I told them they could not be mods with a Grouply-subscribed YID (before I decided to abolish Grouply users altogether).  But in the past they have given me nice positive feedback when I did things to protect the group’s integrity, privacy and security, so I know they appreciate the effort.  I have not lost any members over this matter, and would not care if a few left because they like Grouply.  Besides, they can be Grouply subscribers and just not use it to connect to my groups.

It seems to me that the way Grouply gained notoriety and public awareness was through spamming.  When you subscribe, by default you are offered a “tell a friend” box to insert the email addresses of others to receive a Grouply advertisement.  Some people have been using that to enter group -owner addies or group posting addies.  Then they also prompt you to say no to a default list of all the groups you belong to, offering a spamming gun to send an advertisement to the group message board of every group where you hold membership.  Then they also had a contest (not sure if that’s still running … see

http://theprizeblog.com/2007/12/01/featured-contest-the-grouply-nintendo-wii-and-ipod-touch-competition/
for existing Grouply subscribers where they gave away toys like an iPod and Nintendo Wii to members who recruited the most new subscribers.  These tactics generated a mass spamming effort among Y! groups, which aroused lots of interest, of course, though not good PR for iGroup Network, Inc. and its Grouply “service” (apparently incarnated at least partly by the principals of linkedin.com, from what I read in trade reports).On the advice of a friend with more experience in Grouplyfication, I planted a lurking account in Grouply temporarily just to see for sure how many people are using Grouply.  None were in my groups.  In the EmailList-Managers group, with 3322 members, less than 1% were using it, including two Grouply staff and, I believe, two moderators who are Grouply fans.

If you run a search on the word grouply in Management | Memberships, you’ll see address changes to @ grouply.com if any members signed up with them.  That happens instantly as soon as someone subscribes to Grouply.  (Sets them up like Freecycle Finder did … Indy Emails going to their Grouply address, and Grouply archives the “take” indefinitely.  Grouply’s bot — they prefer the word “application” or “service” — does the Yahoo email address verification in the background.)  They can switch to Grouply’s new “web connection” mode once they are signed up, where Grouply’s bot uses their YID and password to simply scrape the group archive instead of getting only new postings by email.  And they DO take the whole archive.  Supposedly their mirroring will eventually keep up to date by removing deleted posts, too, if you trust Grouply to do that.  I don’t.

They claim we should trust them because they have TrustE certification.  Yadda, yadda, yadda.

If a member’s address changed to grouply and back again, there’s no way you’ll know if it’s because they just switched their Grouply account to web connection mode for your group, or they quit Grouply, unless you create a dummy YID and sub it to Grouply to monitor your group.  That exposes your group to whatever risks may be involved, but within Grouply you can turn off the connection to your group for your dummy ID, and turn off visibility of your Grouply profile to other Grouply subscribers.  (It takes them a while to scrape an entire archive … in my testing I found that even for a tiny test group archive with only three postings, they did not pick it up within 15 minutes.)  Then, when you want to check on your group, you can temporarily turn on the connection for a couple minutes just to see how many of your members are using Grouply.  If you’re not inclined to block Grouply access (see below), this dummy lurker method would at least tell you how popular Grouply is among your members.  I doubt you have more than 1% Grouply subscribers right now, and I don’t see it ever having potential to go higher than 10% anywhere.  Not enough advantage in the product for the average YG user.  No doubt attractive only to a very specialized nitch, but its fans think it’s going to be the next Google or Microsoft, of course.

But it only takes ONE member to give them access to mirror your message archive to their server.

I guess you could also issue a poll to see how many of your members want to allow Grouply access, but I think it would be a waste of time.

Grouply claims not to let non-members of your group access your archive, but already they were caught with their pants down (admitted publicly by their CEO Mark Robins) letting a member pending approval in a group see its members-only restricted message archive … not hard to do when you have already scraped the archive using other members’ passwords.  They say they have fixed that problem.  What other problems may arise you can guess.

Another somewhat creepy thing is that Grouply subscribers BY DEFAULT (unless they turn it off) display to other Grouply subscribers a hotlinked list of the home pages of all the groups where they hold membership.  Nice spying tool.

Someone reported that they learned some rather private things about other Grouply subscribers in their group, like membership in a certain type of mental health peer support group, membership in a group for a certain sexual orientation, the member’s non-Grouply email address (because it was not turned off in their Grouply profile privacy settings), their real full name, etc.  People are notoriously careless about combing through all the privacy settings and fine print in “services” like this.  Sharing such things should be defaulted OFF, but Grouply defaults many of them ON.  It’s only a matter of time before a criminal stalker makes use of it.

It was interesting to see some Grouply subscribers belonging to as many as 500 groups, and people holding memberships in scores of Freecycle groups all over the country.  I guess they are doing research?  Stalkers, scammers, con artists, spammers, phishers and pedophiles are known to do research, too.  Grouply may become popular among that crowd.

And then there are those using Grouply’s subscriber spamming tools just to irritate people against Grouply!  Nothing like hurting someone from within their own system, anonymously under an alias.

Due to an uproar among mods/owners, Grouply just came out with a scheme to let group owners “opt out” (gotta love it) of allowing Grouply access to their groups.  It’s pretty simple.  Go to:

http://www.grouply.com/owner_controls.php

… and punch in your group name.  They email your group -owner addy an authorization code.  Go back to that page and paste in the code.  It lets you disable Grouply access, and you can go back and enable it later if you decide Grouply is a good thing after all.  Their “disablement” is not an absolute abolishment of the appearance of your group name in Grouply subscriber profiles, but reportedly they are still working on that.  They say they are going to come up with some other tools for group owners to control Grouply subscriber access, even offer a newsletter to owners with group stats and such.

Of course you have no contractual commitment from them that they won’t change their minds later about letting you opt-out of being invaded, or that a new owner of their company won’t change its rules.  I have not seen it added to their TOS.  Maybe they will get around to that.

If you use that blocking tool, Grouply subscribers in your group will have their email address set back automatically by Grouply’s bot to pre-grouply default (and they screw that up every time by setting the member to their junk free yahoo email address, not the non-yahoo one they had previously set as their primary, but the member can fix than manually … oh, and they don’t remove their grouply address as an alternate posting address in YG “myprefs”), and they’ll still be a member of your group, just won’t be able to access it via the Grouply.com site.

I used my temporary lurking account in Grouply to verify that the block works.  (BTW, I never subscribed that lurker to your group!)

Yahoo has been silent on the matter so far, but plenty of people have griped to them, and got standard “we’re looking into it” form letters.  I assume it’s just a matter of time before they pronounce a decision on it in their Yahoogroups Blog, as they eventually did on the Freecycle Finder issue …
http://www.ygroupsblog.com/blog/

I just don’t like the smell of the whole thing, and my group’s restricted, members-only message traffic is not on the market for them to use to generate targeted and context-based advertising (which they will do when they get out of beta).  I’m never fond of being told, as someone described it, “Guess what?  You’ve been hijacked.  If you don’t want to fly where we’re going, here’s a parachute!”

Besides, in my exploration of the product, I was not impressed, and did not find it gave me any advantage or “improved my experience of YG,” their pitch for why you should give them your password.  And they only grab your message archive, not files, links, databases, or photos.  Grouply CEO Mark Robins announced publicly that they have no interest in those YG features.  No money in it, I guess.

See also:
Anti-Grouply:
http://tech.groups..yahoo.com/group/ungrouply/

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/grouplycomplaints/

Pro-Grouply (including Grouply’s CEO and another Grouply exec posting here):
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/grouplyimprovements/
Even here, where the aim of the group is to help Grouply improve their beta,
less than 10% of the members are actually Grouply subscribers (I checked
from within Grouply), and even far fewer post via the Grouply service.  Most
of the members seem to be there just to keep tabs on what’s going on.

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/yahoo_group_of_groups/

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/EmailList-Managers/
Same moderator as the GrouplyImprovements group above.

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Grouply Troubles Easy as 1-2-3

February 18, 2008

The blog comment writer cited below details three main areas of concern that he says he has not seen Grouply.com executives address adequately.  They are (in paraphrased summary):

1.  Impropriety of using private volunteer group activity archives for profit-making purposes.

2.  Risks of surrendering Yahoo! ID password, and possible liability of those who do it.

3.  Inability of Yahoo! to provide security of group archives that have been mirrored to the Grouply.com system in violation of YG Guideline #11 and TOS.

From the Yahoo! Groups Blog …
February 12, 2008 @ 9:30 pm

[begin snippet]
Regardless of what Grouply executives Rich Reimer and Mark Robins say, here are the concerns about Grouply that I have not seen them address to my satisfaction in any of their dialog in the various groups addressing this topic: …
[end snippet]

Read the rest of the blog comment at:

<http://www.ygroupsblog.com/blog/2008/01/24/groups-tip-re-posting-content-from-a-group-without-the-original-poster%e2%80%99s-permission-is-a-violation-of-the-groups-guidelines/>

or

http://tinyurl.com/3cfzbx

(just search for the word grouply on this page to find the comments on Grouply.com)